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System Upgrade #8078

CommentPress Updates

Added by Margaret Galvan about 2 years ago. Updated about 2 years ago.

Status:
Assigned
Priority name:
Normal
Category name:
WordPress Plugins
Target version:
Start date:
2017-05-02
Due date:
% Done:

0%

Estimated time:

Description

It looks like we need to do some housekeeping regarding CommentPress as we have, in effect, multiple versions activated because of how the theme/plugin has grown and changed its name along with updates.

In the past, you would activate the CommentPress theme and then also activate certain CommentPress plugins to make CommentPress work. Now, you simply activate the CommentPress Core plugin (https://wordpress.org/plugins/commentpress-core/), which has a theme embedded. That means that we need to remove the out-of-date CommentPress theme, as well as these two CommentPress plugins: Commentpress Ajaxified, CommentPress

I have looked into these two CommentPress plugins on our GitHub install and verified that both were updated 6 years ago (cp-ajax-comments, commentpress), which verifies that they are just as outdated as the CommentPress theme (also updated 6 years ago). https://github.com/cuny-academic-commons/cac/tree/1.10.x/wp-content/plugins

Additionally, we should update the CommentPress Core plugin. We are at version 3.9.3, but the most recent version is 3.4: http://futureofthebook.org/commentpress/download/

History

#1 Updated by Matt Gold about 2 years ago

Just to note the obvious: we can consult with Christian if we have questions around any of this. I've added him as a watcher here.

#2 Updated by Boone Gorges about 2 years ago

  • Target version set to 1.10.19

Thanks, Maggie.

Additionally, we should update the CommentPress Core plugin. We are at version 3.9.3, but the most recent version is 3.4: http://futureofthebook.org/commentpress/download/

The latest version available in the WP repo is 3.9.3, which is what we are running, and which is higher than 3.4. I'm guessing that the futureofthebook.org page is not kept up to date.

We can certainly hide the legacy CP plugins. Removing them altogether will probably mean forcing legacy sites to update, which I'd imagine is a somewhat manual process (at least, it'd have to be triggered manually on each individual site). Here are the sites running CommentPress:

    [0] => http://testprivategroup.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [1] => http://youthliteracy.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [2] => http://sociology101.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [3] => http://dissworksfall12.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [4] => http://dh2013methods.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [5] => http://amstprosemsp13.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [6] => http://thesocialpaper.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [7] => http://writealotling.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [8] => http://librarians.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [9] => http://eshtestcac.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [10] => http://historyimages.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [11] => http://ianphillips.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [12] => http://techlitfrench.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    [13] => http://crisp.commons.gc.cuny.edu

Christian, would you mind sharing your recommendation here? The easiest path forward for me is to simply hide the old CommentPress and related plugins so that they can no longer be activated, but to leave them in place on existing sites. But you'll know better than I will just how hard and/or valuable it'll be to actually migrate them.

#3 Updated by Christian Wach about 2 years ago

Boone is correct about versions - the site lists the last available version of CommentPress before it became CommentPress Core and moved to the WordPress Plugin Directory. The site should be running 3.9.3.

There are detailed upgrade instructions at https://wordpress.org/plugins/commentpress-core/ but I'm not sure if this will be affected by the fact that the two have been running side-by-side for so long. Usually the upgrade would have tried to deactivate the old plugins and migrate the options to the new format. The comment metadata should not be affected since that has not changed - i.e. the additional column in the comments table (CommentPress itself predates the introduction of the comment_meta table) is still the means by which this is stored. At worst, therefore, the CommentPress Core settings might have to be regenerated.

My recommendation would be to try and upgrade the legacy sites with the above caveats in mind.

#4 Updated by Margaret Galvan about 2 years ago

Yeah, I misread 3.9.3 even though I typed it out correctly. Sorry about that.

I don't think it's necessarily bad to have the two versions running side-by-side unless, of course, someone tries to activate both old and new together, which might seem to make sense. That wouldn't work and would cause problems for them, I'm willing to bet. Especially since we have the most up-to-date version, I see no reason to publicly offer the older versions. Whether we migrate the older sites to the newer version or allow them to maintain the older version of CommentPress (that we don't make publicly accessible to activate) is another question.

#5 Updated by Boone Gorges about 2 years ago

  • Category name set to WordPress Plugins
  • Status changed from New to Assigned
  • Assignee set to Christian Wach
  • Target version changed from 1.10.19 to Future release

The CommentPress theme was already network disabled.

In https://github.com/cuny-academic-commons/cac/commit/8278248bcded8b02baf07ecc2005db0ed1f72f11 I've disabled the commentpress and cp-ajax-comments plugins from being activated.

For the time being, I'm leaving the plugins in place, and not doing any migration of existing sites. It's worth doing at some point, but it'll take some manual work that I haven't got the bandwidth for at the moment. Perhaps Christian could take charge of that process at some point? Once existing sites are migrated to commentpress-core, we can remove the old plugins and theme.

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